Thursday, September 8, 2022 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Indie Anniversaries

Paul Kim:

It’s been 16 years ago today since Hazel’s first release. Why celebrate the 16th anniversary? Because I thought it was actually 15 years but got the dates wrong. So, to mark the 16th anniversary (or a belated 15th, if you prefer), Hazel is 30% off.

Christian Tietze:

I realized that my official 10th “company” anniversary is just around the corner!

Thanks everyone for joining the AMA yesterday! Was a fun experience :)

We talked about a couple of technical and historic things.

Ken Case (tweet):

Speaking of time flying, today marks the 30-year anniversary of the day we started doing business together as “the Omni Group.”

[…]

We’ve seen a lot of operating system releases over the last 30 years—coincidentally, 30 years ago today was also the day that NeXT shipped the NeXTSTEP 3.0 operating system!

Christopher Atlan:

I forgot to tweet this year, but Aug 29 marked 16 year of Letter Opener!

Previously:

Update (2022-09-09): Peter N Lewis:

@keyboardmaestro is 20 years old this year. Michael Kamprath released Keyboard Maestro in 2002, but I didn’t acquire it until 2004 for the release of version 2.0.

Steve Troughton-Smith:

Tomorrow marks the 15th anniversary of me building apps for iPhone. Before App Store, before iPhone SDK, there was a passionate community of developers exploring that new frontier on jailbroken devices. I built my first app without access to any device, and debugged it via email

Update (2022-09-22): Paul Kafasis (tweet):

20 years ago this month, Rogue Amoeba unveiled Audio Hijack 1.0, the very first version of what has become our flagship product. To celebrate that anniversary, we’ve got a great deal to share with you.

My DropDMG and SpamSieve are also 20 this year.

Nick Heer:

There is something very special about using products made by independent developers like these. It is software with personality, driven by a level of care and passion that is understandably lost in larger organizations. When I am having trouble or want to request a feature enhancement, I can send an email from somewhere in the application and receive a response from a real person who has the power to make things happen. Institutional developers have their place, but I feel an level of individual care from the indie software projects I use on a daily basis.

Accidental Tech Podcast:

🎉 ATP EPISODE 500!!! 🎉

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