Archive for August 10, 2018

Friday, August 10, 2018 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Redesigning Siri and Adding Multitasking Features to iOS

Kévin Eugène (via Mitchel Broussard):

The first part of this concept is focused on Siri. The idea here is not to create new commands, rather to display existing vocal requests that work well (like « Find me a good restaurant nearby » or « Get me pictures of Japan I took last year ») in a different way so they could be more useful to the user.

In iOS Mogi, Siri has been designed around a concept I call parallel help. The idea is to have a vocal assistant that is non-intrusive (it won’t take the whole screen like it does today), context aware, and can do things in the background for the user while they are doing something else.

Exporting Apple Notes to Markdown

Felix Krause (tweet):

At some point I noticed how some notes are not properly synced. After further investigation, turns out, my notes haven’t properly synced in months, and my iPhone and my 2 Macs are completely out of sync.

But hey, Apple of course follows GDPR, and they offer a great way to export notes

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204055#note

To copy notes, open the Notes app on your Mac or at iCloud.com. Copy the text of each note and paste it into a document on your computer, such as a Pages or TextEdit document. Save the document to your computer.

With over 2,000 notes, this seems slightly inefficient.

So he wrote a Keyboard Maestro macro that pastes into Bear.

The Notes app is AppleScriptable, but it only lets you access the HTML of the notes, not the attachments. Previously, people have accessed the Notes database directly using SQLite, but Krause says this is no longer possible due to encryption.

Notes also has a non-scriptable Export command that creates PDFs, but it can only be used on one note at a time.

Shutting Down the Berkman Center Blogs

Harvard:

In 2003, the Berkman Center for Internet & Society (now the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society) began an unusual experiment: we launched a blogging platform. That seems quaint today in the age of ubiquitous access to services that facilitate the sharing of user-generated content. But it was an uncommon achievement at the time.

[…]

Our platform no longer offers a unique opportunity for online engagement. And it is technically antiquated when compared with contemporary, streamlined platforms that offer more advanced tools for social interactions.

[…]

At this point, for all of the reasons set out above, we feel that the time for hosting content from non-Harvard-affiliated bloggers on Harvard servers has passed. We are giving non-Harvard users with active blogs the opportunity to export existing content over the coming weeks. Those users will then be transitioned off the platform.

Dave Winer:

I heard about this just now. Harvard’s was the first academic blog hosting service in the world. Apparently they’re going to take the archive offline. There’s a lot of value and history there. Please let’s discuss before throwing it away.

Throwing out this archive is like throwing out an academic journal. Why would a university do that? One of the reasons we did this work at a university was the hope/expectation it would survive over time. Only 15 years later, they want to throw it away?

The PSPDFKit Story

Swift by Sundell (tweet):

Peter Steinberger, creator and CEO of PSPDFKit, joins John to talk about building and maintaining a large framework project, how PSPDFKit came to be, how his team works with Radar, and all the challenges and excitement that comes with running a business based on a closed source SDK.

For the longest time, I assumed that the “PS” was for “PostScript,” but it’s actually just namespacing using Steinberger’s initials.