Archive for August 9, 2022

Tuesday, August 9, 2022 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Implementing Parts of the Swift Compiler in Swift

Douglas Gregor:

Here’s a proposed build process for the Swift compiler with Swift code in it:

  1. Build C++ bits with the host C++ compiler
  2. Build mandatory Swift bits with the host Swift compiler
  3. Link a “minimal stage 1" Swift compiler
  4. Build optional Swift bits with the minimal stage 1 compiler. Note that these bits may not be fully optimized because the stage 1 compiler may lack some optimizer passes.
  5. Link a “full stage 2” Swift compiler
  6. Rebuild optional Swift bits with the stage 2 compiler.
  7. Link a “final stage 3” Swift compiler

[…]

Personally, I’m excited to open the door to having more Swift code in the compiler, but I want to make sure we’re doing so in a way that doesn’t make it unduly complicated to develop the Swift compiler or port to other host architectures.

Previously:

Update (2022-08-10): See also: Hacker News.

Which iOS 15 and macOS 12 Monterey Features Do You Actually Use?

Adam Engst:

The most notable finding is that most of them don’t use most of the features listed. Only four features—Live Text, Shortcuts, Hide My Email, and Memories in Photos—received more votes saying they were Occasionally or Frequently used than Never used. (A fifth feature, App Privacy Report, was close, with only 57 more people on the Never side.) It seems probable that those responding to the survey were more likely than the average Apple user to use these features, suggesting that a broader survey would have shown even lower usage levels.

[…]

One could conclude that Apple is putting too much focus on adding features and too little on fixing bugs, improving performance, and polishing existing features.

[…]

Another conclusion is that both Apple and the tech media need to do a better job of introducing new features to users. A common refrain among the comments was that many people—including many regular TidBITS Talk participants, who are probably even more involved than average TidBITS readers—didn’t even know about many of the features.

I use Live Text frequently and Shortcuts and translation occasionally. Often, translation doesn’t support support the language that I need so I end up going to Google Translate.

Previously:

Update (2022-08-11): Nick Heer:

I mentioned “discovering” features. One reason for this, I think, is because Apple often mentions features without explaining or demonstrating them. Maybe I am just busier now or my brain is getting mushier with age, but I find I often have to look through Apple’s marketing pages to try to make sense of anything that has been announced. Minor software versions also quietly carry unannounced new features, too. When Visual Lookup was released in Canada with a software update earlier this year, it was not mentioned in the release notes.

Neither the marketing pages nor the release notes have links to the help pages that explain what the features do and how to use them.

South Korea Investigates App Store

Hartley Charlton:

In a statement (via Reuters), the Korea Communications Commissions (KCC) said that it conducted an inspection of Apple, Google, and One Store since May 17 to determine if they have violated in-app payment laws, and concluded that all three companies may have done so. Such contraventions could include unfairly delaying the review of mobile content, or refusing, delaying, restricting, deleting, or blocking the registration, renewal, or inspection of mobile content that uses third-party payment methods.

Previously:

Update (2022-08-10): Florian Mueller:

I predicted this after Google rejected updates to KakaoTalk (commonly referred to as KaTalk), a messenger app used by about 93% of Korean smartphone users, the reason for those rejections being KaTalk’s use of external payment methods (via its website).

[…]

The Yonhap report doesn’t specifically indicate that the KCC may consider the 26% app tax rate a violation of the country’s IAP rules. Maybe the KCC is going to focus on behavioral rather than numerical issues, at least for now--they’ve got to start someplace.

Labeling Apple Shipments From Taiwan

Cheng Ting-Fang and Lauly Li:

Apple told suppliers on Friday that China has started strictly enforcing a long-standing rule that Taiwanese-made parts and components must be labeled as being made either in “Taiwan, China” or “Chinese Taipei,” sources familiar with the matter told Nikkei Asia, language that indicates the island is part of China.

[…]

Using the phrase “Made in Taiwan” on any import declaration forms, documents or cartons could cause shipments to be held and checked by Chinese customs, the sources added. Penalties for violating such a rule is a fine of up to 4,000 yuan ($592) or, in the worst-case scenario, the shipment being rejected, one of the sources said.

Via John Gruber:

Apple’s reliance on China has put the company in a spot where it must insist its suppliers print a falsehood on components to comply with communist propaganda.

Previously: