Thursday, March 17, 2022 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Flickr to Limit Free Accounts to 50 Private Photos

Alex Seville (Hacker News):

Photographers who craft and create work that might be considered risqué by some will have a safe place online to interact with one another, share mutual interests, and put their art into the world without the fear of it being removed or them being banned entirely from the communities they love. […] To support these creators, and ensure that their communities continue to thrive, the ability to share restricted and moderate content will be reserved for Flickr Pro members.

[…]

The second change relates to non-public photo limits. Flickr is all about sharing photos, giving feedback, finding inspiration, and connecting with your fellow photographers. It’s a lot harder to do any of that with non-public photos. With that in mind, we’re limiting free accounts to 50 non-public photos (e.g. photos marked as private, friends, family, or friends and family.

[…]

The above changes mean that for free accounts, photos over the 50 non-public photo limit or any moderate or restricted photos will be at risk of deletion. If this sounds familiar, it should.

Flickr Foundation:

Imagine if we could place ourselves 100 years into the future and still have access to the billions of photos shared by millions of people on Flickr, one of the best documented, broadest photographic archives on the planet.

The Flickr Foundation represents our commitment to stewarding this digital, cultural treasure to ensure its existence for future generations.

Previously:

Update (2022-04-21): Alex Seville:

Today we’re rolling up our sleeves and getting started with the hard work of making it happen. We’ll walk through what you can expect in the coming weeks, and offer all the resources we can along the way.

3 Comments

"at risk of deletion" is their favourite term, but they've never deleted any photos. Does that make them liars or just good marketers?

I'm surprised that anyone still uses Flickr. That site died 10+ years ago.

Contrary to Ben’s sentiment, I still find great value in Flickr and am a proud Pro member. No other service I’ve found gives me such a wide array of extensibility, and fully retains all metadata for each image.

Stay up-to-date by subscribing to the Comments RSS Feed for this post.

Leave a Comment