Archive for January 19, 2021

Tuesday, January 19, 2021 [Tweets] [Favorites]

ReadKit for iOS

Balazs Varkonyi (tweet):

  • All your reading in one place, multiple account support.
  • Sync with all major RSS aggregator and read later provider or use it with built-in RSS engine.
  • Feed and folder management for RSS services.
  • Folder and tag management for Instapaper, Pocket, Wallabag and Pinboard.
  • Offline reading and image caching.

It’s $3.99 vs. $9.99 for the Mac version.

Dieter Bohn:

If you want to know the state of RSS in 2021, I can point to no better example than Samsung just casually using what used to be the accepted default RSS icon for its mobile hotspot because it never occurred to them that people might think this icon represented something else.

On the other hand, two new iOS RSS apps released just one week apart, plus a big NetNewsWire update in testing.

Previously:

NSSavePanel Crashes on Big Sur

Christian Tietze:

By now, I expected NSSavePanel.allowedContentTypes to work, and then to have Xcode suggest to wrap access to that property in an if-@available block. But that doesn’t work at all. With macOS 10.15 Catalina being my main dev machine, I cannot use the new API at all at the moment, it seems, no matter what I set the deployment target to.

[…]

It actually turns out that public.csv is not a built-in file type recognized by macOS. The archived docs for UTIs list many UTIs, but not CSV.

So make sure to check your assumptions when you write apps that export data without actually registering the exported file type UTIs!

How to Reserve Time Machine Space on an APFS Drive

Glenn Fleishman:

What Apple appears to be saying is an APFS Time Machine volume requires a single container that takes up the entire disk—you can’t add other containers, and that container has access to all the store space on the disk. Within that container lives a Time Machine volume. If you want to use the disk for other purposes, don’t add a container; instead, use Apple’s advice and add a volume within the existing container.

That is limiting, because the Time Machine backup could eventually swell to fill the entire available storage in the container (and disk), crowding out the other volume or volumes you create.

Previously:

Signal Review

Josh Centers:

Signal had a bumpy start, but it’s now a well-polished and full-featured messaging app available for the most common platforms: iOS, Mac, Android, Windows, and Linux.

[…]

Every part of Signal is open source. The clients are published under the GPLv3 license, and Signal’s server code is published under the AGPLv3 license. All of Signal’s source code is available for public inspection on GitHub. I should point out that while I’m a big fan of open source and believe it makes for better security, it’s not a panacea. Unless you compile the final binary yourself, you can’t know for sure what’s in the code. That’s not to say that Signal is doing anything nefarious, just that it’s not impossible.

[…]

One of Signal’s most prominent critics is Chinese maker and YouTuber Naomi Wu, who claims that Chinese activists using Signal were arrested by the Chinese government. She has repeatedly pointed to two security vulnerabilities in Signal: the potential of compromised phone IMEIs and possible leaks from the phone’s keyboard software. To be clear, these concerns apply only to activists or people who are government-level targets.

Previously: