Wednesday, December 10, 2014 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Insecure Keyboard Entry

Daniel Jalkut:

I’ve been running my tool for a few weeks, confident in the knowledge that it will prevent me from accidentally typing my password into a public place. But its aggressive nature has also revealed to me a couple areas that I expected to be secure, but which are not.

[…]

The nice “•” is new to Yosemite, I believe. Previously tools such as sudo just blocked typing, leaving a blank space. But in Yosemite I notice the same “secure style” bullet is displayed in both sudo and ssh, when prompting for a password. To me this implies a sense of enhanced security: clearly, the Terminal knows that I am inputting a password here, so I would assume it applies the same care that the rest of the system does when I’m entering text into a secure field. But it doesn’t.

[…]

Apple makes a big deal in a technical note about secure input, that developers should “use secure input fairly.” By this they mean to stress that any developer who opts to enable secure input mode (the way Terminal does) should do so in a limited fashion and be very conscientious that it be turned back off again when it’s no longer needed. This means that ideally it should be disabled within the developer’s own app except for those moments when e.g. a password is being entered, and that it should absolutely be enabled again when another app is taking control of the user’s typing focus.

1 Comment

While Apple should obviously fix this issue, and it would do some good under certain circumstances, if you've got a rootkit keylogger, it's still not going to do you much good, no?

(Personally, I've always loved the QuicKeys "Insert Text" action, which doesn't actually type the text, for password entry...)

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