Archive for February 1, 2019

Friday, February 1, 2019 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Clearing the Icon Services Cache in Mojave

Howard Oakley:

After all these 35 years, and numerous bug reports, Apple still doesn’t provide any tool to rebuild the IconServices cache. You might find that restarting in Safe mode (with the Shift key held down), leaving your Mac a couple of minutes, then restarting back in normal mode, might do the trick, if you’re lucky, but as far as I know, that doesn’t force the IconServices cache to be rebuilt. Neither does resetting the SMC or NVRAM, although sometimes they’re recommended.

If all else fails, and you have to force the IconServices cache to be rebuilt, the only way seems to be to delete it at the command line.

[…]

The command to remove the main store is

sudo rm -rfv /Library/Caches/com.apple.iconservices.store

That for the subsidiary data is

sudo find /private/var/folders/ \( -name com.apple.dock.iconcache -or -name com.apple.iconservices \) -exec rm -rfv {} \;

which includes the Dock icon cache too.

Once you have done that, you’ll need to restart and give your Mac plenty of time to rebuild the caches.

Previously: Clearing the Icon Services Cache in Yosemite.

Comparing Xcode Target Build Settings

Paulo Andrade:

Simply shift+click the targets you want to compare and then enable the “Levels” toggle on the top filter bar.

By doing so, Xcode displays each target’s settings side by side for easy comparison. Furthermore, you can/should also enable the “Customized” toggle make it even easier to spot differences.

Not only does this Xcode feature have none of the drawbacks mentioned before, it also allows you to compare more than 2 targets! Simply shift+click another target and another column is displayed!

Blocking the Big 5: Google

Kashmir Hill (Hacker News, via Dare Obasanjo):

I’m saying goodbye to all that this week. As part of an experiment to live without the tech giants, I’m cutting Google from my life both by abandoning its products and by preventing myself, technologically, from interacting with the company in any way. Engineer Dhruv Mehrotra built a virtual private network, or VPN, for me that prevents my phone, computers, and smart devices from communicating with the 8,699,648 IP addresses controlled by Google. This will cause some huge headaches for me: The company has created countless genuinely useful products, some that we use intentionally and some invisibly. The trade-off? Google tracks us everywhere.

[…]

This experiment is not just about boycotting Google products. I’m also preventing my devices from interacting with Google in invisible or background ways, and that makes for some big challenges.

Update (2019-02-04): Bogdan Popa:

I spent this past weekend de-Google-ifying my life and, despite my expectations, it wasn’t too hard to do.

[…]

Why go through all this trouble? I’ve grown increasingly concerned this past year with how much access Google has to our lives. They are the world’s biggest advertising company and they have access to most of our web browsing via Google Chrome (62.5% market share – although given the amount of broken websites (some explicitly Chrome-only!) I’ve found since switching to Firefox, I believe this number may actually be higher), all our website visitors via Google Analytics and Google Fonts. Much of our communication via GMail and Google Apps and much of the content we consume every day via YouTube. I’m not even going to get into all the information they gather from people who use Android phones.

Passwords and Muscle Memory

Brent Simmons:

What I realized is that — probably for many years — I didn’t actually know my password. I couldn’t have told you what it is. I just relied on my fingers to know it. And since it always worked, I never thought to question it.

And then, one day at random, my fingers failed. And the more I tried to figure it out — trying things that seemed likely — the more I worried I was fuzzing my muscle memory.