Tuesday, June 12, 2018 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Installing and Debugging on Mojave

Howard Oakley:

Many developers are reporting that they have been unsuccessful in getting the initial beta-release of macOS 10.14 Mojave to install on external drives. In many cases, they are connecting the external drive via a USB-C adaptor to a MacBook or MacBook Pro.

I too had exactly this problem: I connected two different USB3 SSDs to my MacBook Pro 14,1 using a good quality USB-C to USB adaptor. Each time that I ran the Mojave installer to install on that external SSD, all it did was copy the install files into a folder, restart, then drop me back into High Sierra from the Mac’s internal SSD.

Jeff Johnson (tweet):

On Mojave, however, the first time after login that you try to debug an app without the com.apple.security.get-task-allow entitlement, the system displays a modal dialog requesting an administrator password:

Developer Tool Access needs to take control of another process for debugging to continue.

[…]

Prior to Mojave, Xcode would request on first launch to “Enable Developer Mode on this Mac”. On Mojave, Xcode no longer requests Developer Mode. However, Developer Mode can still be enabled manually with /usr/sbin/DevToolsSecurity -enable in Terminal. After you authenticate with DevToolsSecurity once, Developer Mode is permanently enabled on Mojave, and you won’t have to authenticate again to debug.

[…]

What happens on Mojave if you try to debug an app compiled with the hardened runtime? If System Integrity Protection is disabled, then nothing changes; it’s the same as I described in the first section of this blog post. So the hardened runtime is enforced by SIP. With SIP enabled, you can still debug your app if it’s compiled with the com.apple.security.get-task-allow entitlement. If an app doesn’t have that entitlement, however, then you can’t debug it at all.

[…]

The hardened runtime is also supposed to make the app ignore DYLD_ environment variables such as DYLD_PRINT_LIBRARIES.

Previously: The Impossible Dream of USB-C.

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