Friday, September 1, 2017 [Tweets] [Favorites]

ARKit Human Interface Guidelines

Apple (via Tim Van Damme):

Not all AR experiences require realistic virtual objects. Those that do, however, should include objects that appear to inhabit the physical environment in which they’re placed. For best results, design detailed 3D assets with lifelike textures and use the information ARKit provides to position objects on detected real-world surfaces, scale objects properly, reflect environmental lighting conditions on virtual objects, cast virtual object shadows on real-world surfaces, and update visuals as the camera’s position changes.

[…]

Holding a device at a certain distance or angle for a prolonged period of time can be fatiguing. Consider how people must hold their device when using your app, and strive for an enjoyable experience that doesn’t cause discomfort.

[…]

Placing a three-dimensional rotation indicator around an object, for example, is more intuitive than presenting text-based instructions in an overlay. Textual overlay hints may be warranted, however, prior to surface detection or if the user isn’t responding to contextual hints.

[…]

Favor direct manipulation over separate onscreen controls.

2 Comments

"Holding a device at a certain distance or angle for a prolonged period of time can be fatiguing."

One of the reasons why I think all the demos shown on iPads are pointless (e.g. the 3D modeling demo with an Apple Pencil).

> Holding a device at a certain distance or angle for a prolonged period of time can be fatiguing

I think this is good advice, but when people read it, they often overstate how important it is. I've done 3D modelling in VR for hours. My arms somehow managed not to fall off. As long as you don't have to hold your arms out straight, not move them at all, and do so for minutes at a time, you're fine.

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