Archive for March 10, 2016

Thursday, March 10, 2016 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Google Doesn’t Prioritize iOS Apps

Federico Viticci:

No matter the technical reason behind the scenes, a company the size of Google shouldn’t need four months (nine if you count WWDC 2015) to ship a partial [Google Docs] compatibility update for iOS 9 and the iPad Pro. Google have only themselves to blame for their lack of attention and failure to deliver modern iOS apps.

Other Google apps also lag behind on iOS. Kirsty Styles:

After launching on Android in October last year, a pitstop feature has finally dropped on Google Maps for iOS today.

Update (2016-03-11): David Sparks:

Somewhere along the line, however, things flipped. These days Microsoft’s iPad apps are arguably better than their Mac apps. I’m particularly impressed with Microsoft Word on the iPad Pro, which I’m using just about every day. Google, on the other hand, has declined.

Flickr Limits Free Accounts

Flickr (via Nick Heer):

The biggest change is that we are making the desktop Auto-Uploadr a Flickr Pro-only feature, giving Pro members exclusive access to the tool. This feature lets you effortlessly upload all of your photos from wherever they are being stored, while making them accessible from any device.

Importantly, it sounds like the iOS auto-uploader is unaffected. The differences between the plans are shown here. I still think Flickr is the best game in town.

GitHub Rate Limiting CocoaPods

Michael Haggerty:

The slow fetches and clones (which sometimes time out) that the CocoaPods community is experiencing are caused by automatic rate limiting on our servers, which is done to make sure that extremely high levels of load in one repository cannot impact other GitHub users. The CocoaPods/Specs repository is more or less permanently being rate limited.

[…]

That said, we’re working in the open-source Git project on patches to fix the pathological behavior you’re experiencing (e.g., see here). We think Git’s handling of shallow clones can be improved, but this might take a while. If the Git client needs to be changed, it wouldn’t help until the new client is in the hands of the majority of your users.

The remaining issues, however, are mostly in the hands of the CocoaPods project. I have the feeling that the easiest possible first step would be to address point 2, by changing CocoaPods to use full rather than shallow clones.