Archive for October 24, 2014

Friday, October 24, 2014 [Tweets] [Favorites]

Repurposing the Titanic

Justin Williams:

Building products with a bootstrapped mentality is completely different than a startup mentality. When bootstrapped, every decision you make affects the bottom line, and that is a bottom line you care about from day one. Trying to convert a platform that wasn’t designed with that in mind proved to be too great of a challenge for me as the sole proprietor of Glassboard. Rather than focusing on improving the core Glassboard product, I spent most of my time trying to cut costs where possible to curb our losses.

Alias Files and Bookmark Files

Daniel Jalkut:

The long and short of it is Apple has moved away from “alias files” in recent years, and now favors a format they call “bookmarks.” To users, the files behave the same way, and Apple continues to call them “aliases” e.g. in the Finder when it offers to make an alias to a file. However, the older system service for “resolving an alias file” does not work on bookmarks.

[…]

The problem was compounded at some point, maybe as recently as OS X Yosemite, when Apple started aggressively converting old alias files into bookmarks. So even if you had an old, functional alias to a folder in your script tree, it may have recently stopped working in FastScripts because Apple converted it … helpfully … to a bookmark.

The Race to Archive TwitPic

Pierre Chauvin (via Nick Heer):

Right now, a collective of Internet archivists and programmers is trying to do the impossible: save more than 800 million pictures uploaded to the Twitter photo-sharing service Twitpic before they disappear down the memory hole after the company’s scheduled shutdown on October 25.

Update (2014-10-29): Twitpic:

We weren’t able to find a way to keep Twitpic independent. However, I’m happy to announce that we have reached an agreement with Twitter to give them the Twitpic domain and photo archive, thus keeping the photos and links alive for the time being. Twitter shares our goal of protecting our users and this data. Also, since Twitpic’s user base consists of Twitter users, it makes sense to keep this data with Twitter.

Via Manton Reece:

This is much better than all those photos becoming broken links, but it’s still a sad statement on the Twitter ecosystem. Twitter threatened Twitpic, then Twitpic decided to shutdown, and in the end Twitter gets all the Twitpic assets anyway for cheap or no money at all. It’s a bizarre end to what only a couple years ago was a $3 million business.

Apple Maps Connect

Greg Sterling (comments):

This afternoon, Apple notified us of a new self-service portal to add or edit local business listings: Apple Maps Connect. It’s intended for small business owners or their authorized representatives (though not agencies) to be able to quickly and easily add content directly into Apple Maps.

The service is free and the listings (or corrected listings) appear on Apple Maps on the PC and in mobile. All users sign in with their Apple IDs and passwords.

I thought we’d see something like this about two years ago, but it’s good that it finally exists.

Update (2015-04-10): Mitchel Broussard:

With the introduction of iOS 8.3 on Appleā€™s mobile devices yesterday, business owners now have the opportunity to claim a point of interest in Apple Maps as their own, thanks to a few additions to the Report a Problem prompt that can be found on each point of interest in Maps (via AppleMapsMarketing).

iTunes 12 MiniPlayer

Chris Johnson (via John Siracusa):

At first, I had no idea how you were supposed to invoke the Mini Player in Yosemite. The first thing I tried was green zoom icon, but that just made iTunes take up the full screen. After clicking on various things in the title bar area, I eventually tried and succeeded with the album artwork. I had mistakenly assumed that clicking the album artwork would give me a larger view of the album artwork.

In the Mini Player, I was similarly confused. Clicking the album artwork made the artwork bigger. Clicking the little double arrow icon was no help, it also makes the album artwork bigger. I’m not sure why Apple decided we needed two ways to see the larger album artwork. The × icon did the trick, but I was afraid to try it, thinking it would quit iTunes.

Update (2014-10-26): Kirk McElhearn:

When you click the close button, the behavior now depends on how you displayed the MiniPlayer. If you displayed it in a way that hid the main iTunes window, closing the MiniPlayer will bring back the iTunes window. If you displayed it and the iTunes window is still visible, then the MiniPlayer window will close, and nothing else will change. In other words, when you close the MiniPlayer, no matter what you do, the main iTunes window will show up again.